Spanish D at the end of the word: 1 letter,5 different sounds. You’ll be suprised when you discover the last one

Depending on the region, Spanish natives pronounce the letter D at the end of a word in 6 different ways.

  1. Silent D.
  2. As a SOFT D [ð]
  3. As a Hard D [d]
  4. As a Spanish T [t]
  5. As the letter Z [θ]
  6. As a Spanish SOFT R [r]

1. Silent D

Silent D is very common in colloquial speech. You can hear people dropping the letter D everywhere.

Examples of words with silent D:

Madríd
Verdád
Ciudád
Libertád
Navidád
 
Ya es Navidad .
Me gusta Madríd.
Vivo en mi ciudád favorita.
 
 
(When the following word starts with a vowel sound, we should pronounce the letter D [ð]).
 

2. Soft D [ð]

This is the correct pronunciation. You can hear people pronouncing the letter D at the end of a word as [ð] in:

  • Spain (Peninsula)
  • Mexico
  • Argentina

Examples with soft D:

Madrið
Verdað
Ciudað
Libertað
Navidað
 
Ya es Navidað.
Me gusta Madrið.

Vivo en mi ciudað favorita.

If the following word starts with a vowel sound, we should pronounce the letter D as a SOFT D [ð], joined to the next word.

Examples:

En navidá ðiré a esquiar.
Madrí ðes precioso.
Visitaré una ciuda ðimportante.

However, you may hear some people skip the letter D.

3. Hard D [d]

It’s more common to hear this pronunciation in some countriees of Latin América, like Argentina or Uruguay.

Examples with soft D:

Madrid
Verdad
Ciudad
Libertad
Navidad
 
Ya es Navidad.
Me gusta Madrid.

Vivo en mi ciudad favorita.

4. Letter D becomes letter T [t]

This is an exaggerated pronunciation. You’ll hear people pronouncing the letter D at the end of a word as a letter T in different places:

  • Spain (Catalonia, Valencia, Balearic Islands)
  • Mexico
  • Chile
  • Argentina

Examples:

MadrIt
Verdat
Ciudat
Libertat
Navidat
 
Ya es Navidat.
Me gusta Madrit.
Vivo en mi ciudat favorita.
 

5. Letter D becomes letter Z [θ]

This is an exagerated form of [ð].

It isn’t a correct pronunciation but it’s accepted and very common in Madriz.

Examples:

Madriθ
Verdaθ
Ciudaθ
Libertaθ
Navidaθ
 
Ya es Navidaθ.
Me gusta Madriθ.
Vivo en mi ciudaθ favorita.
 

6. Letter D becomes letter R [r]

There’s quite a lot of people in Spain -high and low educated- who pronounce the letter D  as [r] at the end of imperatives.

Sintactically, this is very incorrect because you’d be substituting an imperative with an infinitive.

Examples:

Venid (venir)
Abrid (abrir)
Tirad (tirar)

Cerrad (cerrar)
Coged (coger)
 
In fact, lots of Spanish natives, make a mistake not only when pronouncing, but also when writing the imperative form of any verb (with the letter R instead of D).
Is not extrange to hear a mum calling his kids: “¡venir aquí ahora mismo!”

1 mistake (almost) everybody do every day they practice their Spanish,
that is preventing them from having a good pronunciation and connect with natives

And what to do instead

8 minutes and 57 seconds, and you can start doing the same from today, if you want.